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and corporations. yet my friends on the other side my friends continue pushing this approach in the name of deficit reduction, but their own leadership admitted we don't have a debt crisis in the country. the architect, congressman paul ryan, said we don't have a debt crisis. speaker boehner said it's not an immediate problem. why should we enact this budget while democrats have a balanced approach to protect the middle class. why should we pass a budget that gets 66% of its cuts from programs for people of low or moderate income. why should we pass a budget that cuts pell grants that helps students or cuts the snap program that helps to feed 48 million people to give a $200,000 tax cut to millionaires? the budget put forward by the congressional black caucus continues the snap program to prevent americans from going hungry. while at the same time, reducing the deficit by $2.8 trillion over 10 years. the american people know we can't cut our way to prosperity, nor can we succeed by pursuing the same failed policies that undermine our economic recovery. the congressional black caucus budget offers a
2011 budget specifically targeted federal grants for first responders as a way of cutting the deficit. >> he's taking advantage of a sad fact in this country. if you live in illinois in a part of chicago that is fluent, even the gun violence taking place in chicago, in your very city, doesn't impact you. so you may not think that urban crime is a reason to change gun control laws, because it doesn't affect you personally. you can literally live away from where people are kill and not have gun violence affect you. and gun control laws wouldn't get at that crime. maybe the trafficking piece, it's a much more complicated issue. wayne lapierre is taking advantage of that. to your point, it's not as if congress is trying to do anything about that. not trying to do the things they could do about urban crime. >> mental health, a lot of that is aided by the affordable care act. and governor, joy makes a good point. if you look at support for stricter gun laws among african-americans, 78% of them support stronger controls, compared with 48% of caucasians, support for stricter gun laws among ur
and leave a nearly $6 trillion hole in the deficit that would lead to tax increases for middle-income families. that isn't balance. that is total imbalance. at the same time, republicans propose cutting $3.3 trillion from programs for people with low and moderate incomes, including hundreds of billions of dollars for food nutrition and medicaid programs. so i want to end by asking the republicans when they come and talk about their tax proposals to name a specific that they would address. it's not in the republican budget. name one, name two, name three. otherwise, it's worse than empty. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: with that, mr. chairman, i yield three members to the gentleman from indiana, r. rokita. mr. rokita: i thank chairman ryan in bringing this budget to the floor. i rise in high support of it. i also am very proud, one of the highest honors i have had in my short time here to serve on this committee. not because of chairman ryan only, but because of the members. by members, i mean republican and democrat mem
to work, taking a shared responsibility approach to our long-term deficits so we bring them down in a balanced smart way and they rejected the idea that we're going to move the economy forward by giving windfall tax cuts to the very wealthiest in the country and the benefits of that would trickle down and lift everybody up. they rejected that lopsided approach that balance the budgets on the backs of everybody but the folks at the very top. balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education by slashing important investments. in that category of spending we make these important investments for our country and our future, they double the cut from the sequester. so those are our investments in our kids' education. those are our investments in science and research to help power our economy. those are our investments to help modernize our infrastructure. they cut transportation by 15% when we have 15% unemployment in the construction industry. so mr. chairman, the american people rejected the kind of uncompromising lopsided approach that we see once again presented here in the hou
nation that does not -- is not riddled with debt and deficit, but also a nation that continues to be the economic leader in the world. and i believe our plan makes -- protects those investments in those key components of growth. and i hope over the coming hours that we will go through this debate and -- and i know we'll have a spirited period of a lot of amendments. this -- this budget i believe will pass and it will have to then find agreement with our colleagues in the house. and i just want to again commend both the chair and, for that matter, the ranking member. at the end of the day, we have to find common agreement to get this done. this issue that hovers all over of our other debates has become a metaphor as to whether our institutions can if you please in the 2 1*9 century. so just as the chair and rank member found agreement through a markup process where both sides were heard and amendments were offered and debated in a fair and open process, i want to both thank the chair and rank member for their commitment. they have different idead about how we get there, but at t
and better jobs for the american people. after all the budgets that never balance and record deficits, job creation, we would be coming off the four best years in modmodern american history, because we had four $1 trillion deficits in a row. another that will, quote, only be $850 billion this year. that's yielded us less than 2% growth a year. we all know if we took the number of americans that have left the work force and recalculated unemployment rate, it wouldn't be 7.8%, it would be about 10.5%. the path that my friends on the other side recommend doesn't work. and the balance in both the r.s.c. budget and ryan budget are much more promising course. they achieve that balance by not raising taxes, while not raising taxes. i think that's very important, too. we certainly aren't undertaxed in this country. my friends on the other side clearly believe that we are. they are going to offer multiple tax increases in all their budgets. i like the budget that does not require tax increases. finally, both these budgets, the republican study committee budget and the republican budget, come to gri
a jobs deficit. we have a budget deficit. and these are the byproducts of a leadership deficit. we still have no budget from the president, in violation of the law. he gets his ncaa bracket in on time but still no budget. this is the fourth time in five years. he set a new record this year, two months with no plan, while we had trillion-dollar deficits and a debt crisis on the horizon. his party leaders, unfortunately, failing offering a serious account of our challenge. no serious plan to grow our economy or create jobs. no plan to ever balance the budget. take more. trillions of dollars more to spend more in washington. that's what got us in this mess in the first place. so what can be done? the good news is that we now have a vehicle for regular order. the democrats derailed the budget process each of the last few years and stopped governing when they stopped budgeting. at least we now have a budget process that's moving. we brought them back in the game this spring. that's a good thing. so what's going to happen in the weeks ahead? well, we will make the case for our priorities. whet
deficits with no end in sight doesn't lead to prosperity, doesn't lead to growth. it leads to financial ruin. i'm also the father of four great kids, two in college and two in high school. they know that as a family they have to plan ahead for the future. we need to create a budget and then live within our means. these are the same principles that my parents past down to me. -- passed down to me. these are the values that montana's families live by each and every day. those values are exemplified in montana's own state legislature. we're the only constitutionally -- where the only constitutionally required duletty is passing a budget. in -- duty is passing a budget. in fact, when they adjourn in a little over a montana, they will have given montana a balanced budget, just like they did last year and the year before and the year before that. it seems simple -- live within your means, spend no more than you take in, but it's not so easy here in washington. right now we are presented with two very different visions for our country, two visions that will lead to two very different outcomes
level. secondarily, if you say deficit reduction, the partisan are leeched out. we are talking about whether it will work to balance the budget. if along the way 35 million become uninsured, that's sad but we don't talk about it because cbo didn't mention it in the score. that's the great trick of paul ryan to recognize if you only talk about budget deficit, where does your budget put the deficit 20, 30 years from now, the amount of things you sneak in under that cloak that you can never put into the conversation in a serious way in normal times is tremendous. that's the central political innovation of his career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's no break through.
deficit by almost $6 trillion in 10 years. reduce ay budget would little under $2 trillion in 10 years. >> what other groups are offering their own budget plan docks water they likely to focus on? >> -- who will be issuing their own budget plans? budget will be similar to patty murray's budget in the senate. increases,ave tax but neither would balance the budget in 10 years. also the congressional black caucus and the congressional progressive caucus will be introducing budget. it's possible a ryan version could be introduced in the senate. >> what is likely to happen in the senate this week? >> it will be democrats making the case for the patty murray budget. convince someto democratic senators who may not support that budget. they will have to sell it to democratic senators as well as republicans. no republicans are likely to vote for the budget. they will be calling for more spending cuts, no tax increases, balancing the budget sooner. >> republicans say this to be the first time in four years they have agreed to put forward a plan. why is this your difference? are a number of diffe
and deficit. i voted against the solution for the fiscal cliff because the headlines would say the fiscal cliff is avoided, and there were three elements. we did not avoid any of them. we raise taxes on every american. we put sequestration down the road and we did zero on deficit problems. we are facing total economic chaos if we are not careful. host: republican caller. pennsylvania. caller: in response to the fiscal cliff, i find him very -- i do not know, i do not believe what he is saying. he is talking about a fiscal cliff, but you want us to accept the people here illegally and give them something they have not earned. i do not understand what republicans are doing. i am a conservative. i do not want amnesty. i do not want them here. host: you might have missed what the congressman said earlier. i will let him respond. guest: what she is saying is she does not want amnesty, and under president bush he had a strong amnesty plan and i said i would not back it. total amnesty like the one president reagan did will cause a lot of problems here and i think we need the workers. obviously,
policy center, the ryan budget would have managed to actually add $5.7 trillion to the deficit . a close look at the math makes it clear that the ryan budget can't recoup the revenue lost from its tax cuts without imposing large tax increases on the middle class families. the tax policy center was unwilling to speculate on where the lost revenue would come from. in addition to the economic policy institute estimates that e ryan budget would kill 750,000 jobs this year, two million next year and increased gross domestic product by 1.7 percentage points. the priorities of this budget are all wrong. it kills jobs, stifles growth and adds to the deficit. all while making life harder for seniors, women, children and the most vulnerable in our society. the math of the budget just does not add up. simple arithmetic tells you that the only way to pay for mr. ryan's proposed tax cuts for the fortunate few is to eliminate many of the deductions that middle class families count on to pay for housing and health care and to save for their retirement. the ryan tax plan would further burden those who a
. >> let me quote dick cheney, who said ronald reagan taught us that deficits do not matter. dick cheney was wrong. he was wrong then and now. of course deficits matter, but any one of you who supported the bush plans has no right to speak. i helped bill clinton balance the budget and build a surplus. why? because we had good economic times. in good economic times, you pay down the deficit, but reagan and bush did not, and in bad you have to stimulate in the near term, as thank god president obama is doing. we democrats will balance the budget once again. >> paul, which is more important to america's pursuit of happiness -- which is more dangerous, excuse me, than a 357 magnum -- >> in my home you would find 17 guns and no cans of soda pop. i have the right wing position on the giant drink soda thing. i do not like the idea, and i think bloomberg is a fine man, but i do not like government telling us what size to buy today. this one, i am with tucker and most of you. i have the right wing position on gun safety. i have the same position as ronald reagan, who was for a waiting period befo
the budget because the president and treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? at the exact same time, the fed tightened rates, doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily if the fed stayed easy, which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable if the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress have repeated the errors of 1937 down to a tee. he can't let the fed's part in the drama be repeated. otherwise he'd go down as the fed chief who never got the economy going and put it back in a recession, a
dollar deficits, no growth, which is true, and we keep having these states with higher taxes and destroying output, it could happen here. it terrifies me. >> what would trigger it would be sharply higher interest rates when people -- in order to buy our debt. not talking about just a few points here but dramatically higher interest rates where it's impossible for us to pay our entire debt load. then becomes a point where we reach financial collapse. >> neil: when people don't trust their financial institution. but when it's your bank bank, your passbook savings account, that is called into question, that galvanizes. then what? >> here's the thing, neil. that almost happened in the past and i think hank paulsen and bernanke and the leadership -- recappallizing the banks was the way to go. in these countries, the banking system is the government. they're so intertwined. we're not there but we're getting there. and remember, once the government -- once they're questions about the sovereign -- sanctity of the dollar, everything falls because our banking system is aligned with our
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
do both. make sure we have deficit reduction but don't cut too much too fast. >> dick durbin also optimistic they can move forward. as congress grapples with developing a budget it must deal with another problem that looms it has to pass a continued resolution before march 27th to avert a government shut down. heather, they go on break at the end of this week. we will see what happens. >> of course they do. they are always going on breakdown there. >>> it is time for your first degree weather update with ma r maria molina. >> maria is in the weather center tracking another storm. is that right? >> yes. a brand new storm impacting portions of the upper midwest today and we are expecting to see snow from the same system into the northeast as we height. we could be seeing significant accumulations especially across places in new england. want to start out with high temperatures. we are seeing wild disparities as far as the temperatures go. take a look at minneapolis. 30 degrees for the high temperature today. it will feel more like january than march. in san antonio you could see rec
and iraq were fought as quote emergencies, which means they weren't included in the annual deficits. so, now, when they're talking about a budget that cuts student loan programs for gi members, people coming back from iraq and afghanistan now they're not getting their student loans. because this was all fought off budget. i think that's political malpractice on the part of the republican party. they should have budgeted for this. >> well, from a congressional physician of the soul like diana degette, thank you so much. now to dr. james peterson, msnbc analyst and director of africana st studies. professor, millions oppose the war, but as you know, and i'm sure you remember, their voices were significantly marginalized. give us a sense of how that happened. >> there's a lot of context here. we have to start with the fact that the sort of american ethos in response to 9/11 was a sort of patriotism, people not in line with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that
that the obama care would be deficit-neutral and control costs i think has turned out to be a charade. if you look at the longer term projections it looks especially more unlikely today than it did when they were engaged in the budget that allowed it to pass. what i think is interesting on the political side is how republicans are treating the issue right now. there is a debate inside the republican party whether it's wise to continue talking about obamacare. on one hand you have a group that says in effect this is over, this is done, we should tweak it, try to improve it, do what we can. let's not focus op it because it's in the past and discussion of aweer thety. on the other hand people think talk about it all the time because implementation is proving difficult and it will be more difficult as we go along to the republicans' benefit. >> bret: the second group of republicans believe the thing could crater. it could just not work. >> correct. that is a possibility. i think that the comment we just heard, there are thousands of pages of regulation that people haven't read is true. i don't ca
billion deficit. they don't want to get to where stock toeupbs righ stockton is right now so they are under this emergency pherg, state control. a lot of people have scheduled a protest today, are being called for to protest this move. what exactly wha will he be responsible for? >> slicing and dicing. cutting salaries of city employees. detroit already has a high crime rate. you don't want what happened to stockton, just like matt said they have per capita more murders in the city of chicago. how is that possible, little stockton? if you look at the map in california everybody was moving out in san francisco, properties were too high there, same with palo at torques silicon valley, they moved to stockton. what could happen in detroit unless they start cutting more. if detroit has to file for chapter 9 bankruptcy municipal that would make headlines around the world and kind prus would be booted off the front page. >> that's what they are trying to do and -- >> the mayor and the city council loose all the authority they shr-fplt they've been trying and they can't do that. the
? >> sure, i do. one problem with the baseline is it brings the deficit later on of the we looked at the budget and realized we could probably balance in five years. the problem is with the way the numbers work is it brings you back out of balance soon thereafter. what we wanted to do is have a credible plan that got us to balancing, got us into surplus. that's what our budget does. there is something unique in the baseline where deficits go down to the mid part of the next ten years and then go right back up. what we want to do is get them on a downward path and keep them down. we not only balance the budget, we go into surpluses and pay off the debt. >> brian: here is chris van hollen. he seems to disagree with everything you say. here is an example. >> i'm used to that. >> let me focus first on what our budget focuses on, which is not just economic growth in jobs in the future, but jobs in economic growth now and in the future. this republican budget is not balanced in ten years. >> brian: is he right? is it not in balance? >> no, it does balance in ten years. they're throwing
deficits and debt. how can you not worry about that. they do seem integrally involved in phobia, a lot of we don't want anybody else coming to this country. >> yeah, yeah, that's -- that's true, chris. it's this idea that they're losing their country. they fear change. they fear -- they're anxious about the change that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be li
deficit. the main attraction at these gambling halls is the new slot machines. we americans spend more money on slots than on movies, baseball, and theme parks combined. but with slots, there is the potential for a dangerous side effect: gambling addiction. and more people are addicted to slots than any form of gambling. [slot machines beeping] >> this is what slot machines used to look like, where you pull the handle and hope for three of a kind. [slot machine beeping] this is what they look like today. the modern slots are like high-tech video games that play music and scenes from tv shows. you can play hundreds of lines at once, and instead of pulling a handle, you bet by pushing buttons, which means each bet can be completed in as little as 3 1/2 seconds. it looks like great fun, but it can be dangerously addictive. >> whether or not it's their intention, the gambling industry is designing machines that can addict people. >> mit anthropology professor natasha schull has studied gambling addiction for over 15 years. she's interviewed gamblers, casino owners, and slot machine designe
calling about the obamacare and also about the deficit in the united states. my feeling is, many workers across america have lost their insurance and have lower wages because of company downsizing and lower profits. we still pay government workers high wages and give them excellent paid insurance. maybe it is time to decrease their wages and to make their -- make them have a payment they have to pay for their insurance -- [indiscernible] guest: interesting point you bring up about people losing their health insurance. in a bipartisan move in this budget, there is a directive to couch the effect of the number of people losing their health insurance because of obamacare. it was a republican sponsored saying -- thing. they will try to see how much it is occurring. host: the house approved the continuing resolution by 310- 109. 27 republicans and 82 republicans voted no. theye senate version, passed -- 20 republicans voted yes. the democrat of montana voted no. now that these two measures have been passed by the separate chambers, what happens next? guest: the cr goes to the president. sign
. even a small deficit, as little as an hour a night, remember how we just recently lost that hour when we jumped forward for daylight savings? ok, can lead to some serious unpleasant conditions, including floppy eye-lids. show of hands, how many of you have had floppy eyelids? [laughter] show of hands for this next one, sexual[laughter]nction? [laughter]
. you think our deficit is bad, they don't print that much money in the fed. we don't have that much in the system. jon: jim gray, good to talk to you. thanks, jim. jenna: breaking news out of washington, d.c. the president is officially announcing his nomination for labor secretary. his name is thomas perez. he is standing next to the president. just a few things he should know about thomas perez. assistant attorney general for the civil rights division right now. he spent a lot of time in his career focusing on consumer rights and protection as well. if he is confirmed, the process that takes place after the official no announcement he will be only latino in the president's cabinet. they need to get americans back to work as labor secretary and what kind of role considering his background mr. perez might play in immigration reform and what type of employment policies could be put in place if there is some overarching immigration reform. we'll keep you posted on the announcement. as we hear more we'll bring that to you. jon: it was ten years ago that operation iraqi freedom launched
trillion deficits -- that would be the annual difference between what we bring in and what the government spends -- four in a row more than a trillion dollars -- after more than $1.6 trillion in tax increases, after hundreds of billions of dollars worth of new regulations, our country is mired, we are mired in the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. that is a direct consequence of this huge debt and our creditors' lack of confidence that we're actually serious about dealing with it. indeed, many workers have simply given up on finding work, which is one reason why our labor force participation rate is now at a 32-year low. unemployment's almost 8% but that doesn't take into account the millions of people who have simply given up looking for work after a long period of unemployment. since june 2009, when the recession officially ended, median household income has fallen by more than $2,400. so instead of treading water, the average american family is seeing their buying power decrease by more than $ 2,400 since 2009. at the same time, they're finding not only ar
federal deficits in five years makes it imprudent to jump in with both feet. consider on tuesday paul endorsed a version of immigration reform that would allow the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants in this country to become legal. the week before he defied the hawks in his party to lead a 13-hour filibuster in protest of the obama admission's secretory over its drone war fare program. >> dan senor, you've been involved in republican presidential primaries lately. sorry about that. how would those issues stack up in new hampshire and iowa and south carolina and florida? >> i think the politics, his politics on pure fiscal issues will have tremendous resonance as his father experienced in some primary states and caucus states. i think what is untested is -- from a -- from a political standpoint is his position on foreign policy. his father never really broke through on the neoisolationist politics at the grassroots level beyond a narrow segment of the electorate. rand who i've spent time talking about these issues is much salvier than his father. >> his father blamed in effect u.
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
. hagan: thank you, mr. president. this amendment establishes a deficit -- the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mrs. hagan: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: this amendment establishes a deficit-neutral reserve fund for families of service members and veterans. my home state has the third largest military footprint in the nation. one out of every three people is in the military, a veteran or related to a service member or veteran, and we are proud that we make military families welcome in north carolina because supporting military families is one of the best ways that we can support our troops. this amendment is deficit neutral. it will not add one penny to our deficit. it helps to create room in the budget for legislation to help military families in areas ranging from health care to housing and from education to job placement while their loved ones are serving our country away from home. a vote for this amendment is a vote for our military families, for the sons, daughters, husbands, wives and families who sacrific
of the problem that we're in as a country in terms of our debt and deficits, we have to have programs that have metrics on them, they have to be followed up, the grants have to be followed, and they need to be held to account. so i hope my colleagues -- i have no hopes of this passing, because most of the colleagues won't actually look at the research that's been done on this, won't look at the effectiveness of it, won't look at the waste, and they'll vote a party-line vote to defeat this amendment. we'll get 45 or 50 votes or 51 or 52. but it'll go down and so consequently real problems that have been oversighted by the permanent subcommittee on investigation, really oversighted by the department of homeland security, the real solutions to problems won't happen because of the way this place is being run. i'd next like to talk about amendment 93. amendment 93 follows a recommendation of the president -- not my recommend day, the president's recommendation. and what this amendment would do is actually take money that has been directed for expired heritage area authorizations that weren't any rec
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)